• Diet 4 MicroGut

    Microorganisms in foods and in humans: study of the microbiota and the related metabolome.

  • Diet 4 MicroGut

    Microorganisms in foods and in humans: study of the microbiota and the related metabolome.

  • Diet-Human health

    The human body houses a huge microbial ecosystem, including the intestinal and oral microbiota. Both these ecosystems, and, in particular, the intestinal one, are responsible for maintaining human health.

  • Diet-Microbiota relationship

    Diet is a reservoir of microbes and the feeding for human resident microorganisms, therefore, it is inevitably linked to diversity and functionality of the oral andintestinal microbiota.

  • Few information is available

    A cross-search for "human gut microbiota" and "health" in the ISI Web of Knowledge database, results in more than 550 hits, only in the last 5 years. Less than 10 hits come out combining the terms “vegetarians” and "human gut microbiota"

Created on 10 November 2014

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0112373

 

 

The salivary microbiota has been linked to both oral and non-oral diseases. Scant knowledge is available on the effect of environmental factors such as long-term dietary choices on the salivary microbiota and metabolome. This study analyzed the microbial diversity and metabolomic profiles of the saliva of 161 healthy individuals who followed an omnivore or ovo- lacto-vegetarian or vegan diet. A large core microbiota was identified, including 12 bacterial genera, found in .98% of the individuals. The subjects could be stratified into three ‘‘salivary types’’ that differed on the basis of the relative abundance of the core genera Prevotella, Streptococcus/Gemella and Fusobacterium/Neisseria. Statistical analysis indicated no effect of dietary habit on the salivary microbiota. Phylogenetic beta-diversity analysis consistently showed no differences between omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and vegan individuals. Metabolomic profiling of saliva using 1H-NMR and GC-MS/SPME identified diet-related biomarkers that enabled a significant discrimination between the 3 groups of individuals on the basis of their diet. Formate, urea, uridine and 5-methyl-3-hexanone could discriminate samples from omnivores, whereas 1- propanol, hexanoic acid and proline were characteristic of non-omnivore diets. Although the salivary metabolome can be discriminating for diet, the microbiota has a remarkable inter-individual stability and did not vary with dietary habits. Microbial homeostasis might be perturbed with sub-standard oral hygiene or other environmental factors, but there is no current indication that a choice of an omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian or vegan diet can lead to a specific composition of the oral microbiota with consequences on the oral homeostasis. 

 

 

 

 

 

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